Iran’s capital remains a place where art thrives

In every corner of Iran, one is reminded that artists were once the bloodline of towns and cities. This was a land where art permeated the everyday – in dishes, on walls, in the delicate Eslimi (Arabesque) carvings on copper bowls used to pour water over one’s head in a public bath.

What is left of it all today? True, Tehran remains a city where art thrives – in a tiny auditorium where tribal Arabs from Khuzestan have come to sing, in patterned displays of flowers beside highways, on stages where performers bring new stories to life.

In everyday objects however – dishes, shirts, shoes – such excellence has long been lost. The consumer economy is one in which the handmade demands high prices and is not thrown around in a public bath, which anyway is no longer there.

The bowls and textiles that once adorned the most humble homes, all bearing the mark of artists, are now museum pieces, replaced by cheap goods from China, India, Bangladesh. The pottery workshops of Meybod, Yazd province, once known as one of Iran’s primary pottery centres, are in a dire state. Cheap pots from Turkey have sent their business into sharp decline.

Read more on Iran’s art capital.

Original published on Business Insider

Lessons From Artists on Hanging Art

Art can intimidate. Often pricey, it can seem imposingly precious—which is why many people take a reverent, by-the-numbers approach to hanging it in their home: on white walls with the center of the print or painting gallery-ready at 57 inches above the floor. Visit the homes of artists, however, and you’ll see that they treat artworks like members of the family, leaning pictures casually against walls or fearlessly displaying sculptures against patterned wallpaper.

That approach, documented in several books out this fall, is one we can all learn from. Marcia Prentice, author of the forthcoming “How We Live” (teNeues), said that a key principle is to look broadly and care deeply: “Creative people are bringing in art from a lot of different sources,” she said. “They don’t feel intimidated by the art—they’re just picking up the pieces that they love.”

That can mean incorporating personal effects, said Stacey Goergen, who co-authored this month’s “Artists Living with Art” (Abrams) with Amanda Benchley. Family mementos are as important as major artworks for art photographer Laurie Simmons and her husband, painter Carroll Dunham. In the living room of their northwestern Connecticut home, the couple has juxtaposed a Sarah Charlesworth photograph with a sculpture by Carl D’Alvia and a work by their daughter Grace. “Laurie mixes a well-known photographer with a mid-career sculptor and then [a piece] made by their daughter when she was in high school,” Ms. Goergen said.

A relaxed attitude also makes a difference when you’re trying to live with art more organically. Throw up a nail and try something, or rotate works regularly. For artists, “it’s not fixed,” Ms. Benchley said. “It’s a more fluid attitude than in a museum. If it doesn’t work, move it.” Here are some strategies you should feel free to borrow from creative insiders.

Introduce Art in Unexpected Places

What do we do at home? We sit—on our sofas and on our Wassily chairs. In his Edinburgh apartment, interior designer Sam Buckley realized that adding art to the living room’s lower half would acknowledge the vantage points of those who were seated. “If you hang art at eye level when you’re standing up, when you sit down you feel as if everything is happening above you,” Mr. Buckley said of this more relaxed approach. “So I’ve got two or three pieces of art just stacked on the floor to give that feeling of inclusion when you’re sitting.” Near the Lucie Bennett drawing that leans against the wall, he installed a cascade of paper lamps with adjustable heights that he found on Etsy, which move the eye vertically. Elsewhere, he hung a small print under the chair rail.

Read more tips here.

Originally published on The Wall Street Journal

Art of the Party at PAMM

Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) sure knows how to throw a party! Putting a contemporary spin on a classic annual gala, the Miami museum pulled out all the stops for its Art of the Party event, including curated entertainment, lavish dining and an A+ guest list. The elegant gala was presented by Louis Vuitton and event planner Lee Brian Schrager, the mastermind of the South Beach Wine & Food Festival.

Karolina Kurkova, Silvia Tcherassi, Craig Robins, and Jackie Soffer, Co-Chairman and CEO of Aventura Mall, were among the fashionable guests. Filled with epicurean delights, Art of the Party featured two dinner options, a delectable chef’s table and lavish supper club, by renowned Brazilian chef Thomas Troisgros.

Following a delicious meal, Miami’s elite gathered in the Knight Plaza to dance under the stars to Brazilian band Batuke Samba Funk featuring Pee Wee Ellis, the legendary saxophone player and band leader for James Brown.

10 Reasons Art Plays a Role in Business

Art in Advertising

Since visual cues are often used in the most successful advertising campaigns, it’s no wonder that so many business owners hire artists and graphic designers to get the point across to the public. Without proper imaging techniques, such as a well laid out billboard or television advertisement, the ad as a whole could fall flat at best and chaotic at worse. Read more

10 Steps to get your Art in a Gallery

Your portfolio is ready to show in an art gallery. You are excited but overwhelmed on how to get this accomplished. Below are 10 steps that will help you achieve your goal. Read more

Example of Art Pieces Entertainer Have Bought

In a world filled with video games, television shows, and fashion, beautiful art is not treasured as it once use to be in the past by most of the world’s population; this does not hold true for entertainers. Most performers (actresses, singers, dancers, etc.) have a rare, respect for the arts. Many successful entertainers have bought art from artists all over the world. Here are examples of art pieces that entertainers have bought:

Leonardo Dicaprio and Oscar Murillo- Leo is considered to be one of the most bankable movie stars to date. He is known for being a partier and ladies man, but he also has a knack for the creative arts. In 2013, Leonardo purchased a piece of art by Columbian artist, Oscar Murillo for over $400,000!

Read more

How Color Paints Are Refined To An Exact Color

The color of a paint is simply a reflection of its light waves. Finding an exact matching paint hue is done by measuring this light in a scan and then generating a formula. This computer program is a tool that calculates the recipe to create any specific color. It took much trial and error to perfect this process. However now in modern times color matching is practically a perfect process.

This computer program is used by large paint manufacturers. It was originally written based on the color wheel. People can still use a manual color wheel to find the correct color values and amounts to create a particular shade. The formulas for color mixing are based on that concept. Put the shade into the wheel and dial up the correct amount of each color to mix. Read more

The Process of Selling Art to a Gallery

Selling your special artwork to a gallery is personal, yet magnificent for all to see. This is what you want. Decisions to place certain pieces of art in a particular gallery depend on the gallery. The theme of the organizers is what helps your art sell. There are a few steps which will help you sell your work.

First, call to set up an appointment, or visit an art gallery where you believe your work will fit in with their theme. Ask yourself what you are trying to say with your craft. Each place has their own tastes and flavor. Be familiar with the art gallery you visit or correspond. Read more